Tag Archives: southeast asia

10 Ways to Experience Kuala Lumpur Like a Local

By Princess Draupadi

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It’s always interesting to hear what foreigners think of Malaysia. Every time I travel and people ask me where I’m from and I say it, I get all kinds of reactions. Good ones, so far.

“Oh my God, Malaysia?!”
“Beautiful country!”
“You’re soooooo lucky.”

The last statement was said to me by an European girl I was having tea with in Madurai.

“Why am I lucky?” I asked.

Her eyes widened. “The SUN!” she exclaimed. “All that sunshine. You get so much SUN! The beach.” She sighed prettily and let herself melt away onto the table in an exaggerated expression of pleasure.

I laughed. Cute girl. She was right, of course. But if only she knew how Malaysians reacted to the sun. How we’re tired of getting too much of it, how we’re constantly running away from it. How people here carried umbrellas and wore long driving gloves to avoid getting tanned. How obsessed we are with air-conditioning.

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As much as I love being everywhere else, I really love Malaysia. Tropical vegetation, blue seas, blue skies. Multiracial, multicultural, both rural and urban in almost equal measure. Like any other country we have our ups and downs (including some of the most corrupt politicians in the world), but I’d rather focus on the good stuff.

Kuala Lumpur

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As with every major city in the world, there’s always a recommended bunch of typical touristy stuff to do. Kuala Lumpur (KL) is no exception, as a Google search will show you.

If you really must look at two colossal steel-and-concrete towers that supposedly represent this city, by all means go ahead. However, I think KL has so much more to offer.

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While the towers are shiny and pretty and everything, I’m of the opinion that the lifeblood of Kuala Lumpur lies in the whole vibe, the collective energy that powers this city. The heart and soul of KL lies in the diversity of its people, food, street life, traffic jams, art and culture.

Having lived all 35 years of my life in this city and Singapore next door, here’s my recommended list of things to experience in Kuala Lumpur. Would you like to live the life of a KLite, do the things we do, at least for a while? Then read on.

But first, a little introduction to the local lingo.

***Special Note on Language: Sentences with the Lah Suffix.***

Most KLites speak English, at levels varying from basic to excellent. While many of us locals speak the language really well, we have a unique way of conversing among ourselves, irrespective of race and ethnic background, a phenomenon known to some as ‘Manglish’.

What’s that? Well, somewhat broken English, peppered with words from various languages and dialects spoken locally including Malay, Cantonese, Hokkien, Mandarin, Tamil, Punjabi and more. For example, macha (Tamil: brother-in-law), jom (Malay street slang: let’s go), tapau (Hokkien: take-away food). Whenever Malaysians get into this mode and start talking like this in a group, we’d understand each other perfectly. Observing foreigners, meanwhile, are generally baffled. 

Brian here says some interesting things about Malaysian culture, and a bit about the language.

To talk like us, add lah to the end of random sentences in conversations with Malaysians. A good way to start trying this out is when you’re ordering food at Malaysian restaurants. You’ll probably use it wrong, but hey, who cares. You’ll surprise the locals, have a good laugh with them and make some great friends – guaranteed.

Here are some recommended ways to use lah accurately:

  • This is my first time visiting Malaysia lah.
  • Can lah / Cannot lah. (When asked if something can or cannot be added to your food, ie pork).
  • It’s so hot lah.
  • I want to buy a drink lah.
  • Can you lower the price? Too expensive lah.
  • Can I have this in blue? I don’t like red color lah.
  • This food is cold lah. Can you reheat it please?
  • This tea is too hot lah. Can you tarik it for me? (Manglish Bonus Point: two street slang words in one go)

So try it. Use the lah. Use it everywhere. Have fun with it, because this doesn’t work outside Malaysia. Where else can you mess up English like this and get away with it?

Now for the list of stuff to try.

10 Ways to Experience Kuala Lumpur Like a Local

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#1 – Taste Signature Malaysian Dishes in KL

Oh the food. KL is a terrible place to be on a diet. If you’re visiting for the first time, don’t even try.

Trying to describe Malaysian food in one blog post is like trying to describe that Avatar planet in one sentence. We have such an incredible variety of grub here that no amount of writing is ever going to do justice to our endless array of gastronomic delights. For the sake of readers however, I will simplify the must-try list of KL-Malaysian foods per below.

Roti canai and teh tarik combo. This is a common Malaysian staple of Indian-Muslim origin. Roti canai is a type of flat bread that is made by spinning the dough in the air until it stretches out. Teh tarik is milk tea that gets its name from being ‘pulled’ – poured in a long stretch from one container to another, until it develops a surface foam. If you’re at the right places, you’ll get to view the impressive theatrics of the undeniably-skilled people making these dishes.

Not a very clear video and probably not Malaysian, but this is a demo of how extreme teh tarik skills can get.

A very KL thing to do is visit a mamak (generally means Indian Muslim) restaurant or street stall, order these, then sit around chatting for hours with friends. You can do this any time of the day and almost anywhere in the city. By the way, the term ‘mamak‘ has also come to mean almost any food place that stays open late, or simply the act of hanging out at these places.

Banana leaf rice. A South Indian style of eating that’s popular in KL. It’s basically rice, curries, vegetables and your choice of Indian meat dishes served on a fresh banana leaf. I’ve done a series of restaurant reviews for KL and Klang Valley for my ‘Banana Leaf Mythbusters’ series: Devi’s Corner, Ganapathi Mess, Nirwana Maju and Moorthy’s Mathai.

The ‘proper’ way is to eat with your fingers, but you can use cutlery and nobody will care. We KLites are a laid-back bunch. So laid back we’re late all the time for everything.

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Ganesh at Moorthy’s Mathai in USJ, Subang Jaya

Nasi lemak. Traditional Malay dish, popular for breakfast. Consists of coconut milk rice, anchovies, a chilli paste, fried peanuts, cucumber and an egg. You can buy it almost anywhere here and it’s often dirt cheap.

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Pan mee. Noodle-based dish of Hakka origin. The star of this dish is the chilli powder-paste. Go easy on the heat if it’s your first time.

Nasi kandar. Rice that can be combined with various curries, meats and vegetables. Ask for a mix of all available curries to eat it like we do.

Nasi goreng. Fried rice, comes in many variations from Chinese to Kampung (village) style. (Malay: goreng = fried)

Noodles. Laksa, mee kolok, tomyam, curry mee, mee goreng mamak, Maggi goreng, fried koay teow. (Note: mamak = Indian Muslim; this term may also be used to refer to hawker and street food in general).

Chinese street and hawker food. Chinese food here is phenomenally delicious. Also, unlike most street fare in Southeast Asia, Chinese food is usually well-tolerated by even the most sensitive of stomachs. The reason for this is Chinese food in KL is always prepared on the spot with fresh ingredients and served piping hot (killing most bacteria like e-coli).

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Durian anything. Despite the high entertainment factor, I don’t recommend durian to foreigners anymore as they just can’t handle it. If you’d like to try one for the sake of experience, then you have an endless variety, from the fresh fruit itself to flavored desserts and ice cream.

#2 – Take a Walk Through Masjid India, Brickfields or Jalan Tengku Kelana 

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These are the ‘Little India’ parts of KL. You can walk around, window shop and simply browse without buying anything and nobody will mind in the least. The shopkeepers are usually more than willing to show you around.

These are great places to buy lungis, kurtas, bangles, bindis, spices, statues and other cool ethnic stuff without being ripped off like in other tourist traps. So walk into some clothing stores and let them tie a saree on you – they’ll do it with a smile. Or, have an Indian tailor sew you some ‘instant’ Bollywood-style stuff on the spot (they charge extra if you want it soon, but it’s totally worth it for a custom-made outfit).

After you’re done for the day, you can finish off with some delicious Indian food at one of the numerous restaurants in any one of those areas.

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Recommended restaurants: Saravana Bhavan (pure vegetarian, Masjid India and Brickfields), Gem Restaurant, Taj Garden, Chat Masala, Anjappar Chettinad, Jassal (all Brickfields).

#3 – Check out the Bukit Bintang Area

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This is the more glitzy part of town and it doesn’t sleep. Bukit Bintang (Literal translation: Star Hill) includes Changkat Bukit Bintang (nightlife and clubs), Bintang Walk (shopping malls, street stalls, buskers), Starhill Gallery (upscale mall), Lot 10 (mall) and more of that kind of thing. There’s a whole lot to do here, so take a stroll and look around. Lots of Arabic culture here too, so you can try the food or indulge in some shisha.

The Sahara Tent is my shopping pit stop, where I refuel on Arabian mint tea and to-die-for baklava.

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If you decide to hit the clubs, the great news is that you can always find a place to eat after you’re done, even if that means 4am. This is thanks to the concept of 24-hour mamak restaurants and stalls in KL. So if you need an ice-lime drink and a hot meal to sober up, you’ll always have some place to go in KL.

#4 – Visit Places of Worship

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I think it’s always nice to follow a local friend to visit their place of worship, regardless how you feel about religion and higher powers. In my experience, most Malaysians will gladly take you with them for prayers, provided you have an open mind.

The main religion in Malaysia is Islam, followed by Christianity, Buddhism and Hinduism. So there’s a whole bunch of pretty temples and mosques around, such as the National Mosque, Buddhist Maha Vihara Temple, Batu Caves Hindu Temple. My favorite is the red Putra Mosque, picturesque on a lake in Putrajaya. Do note that if you’d like to visit places of worship, you’re required to dress modestly (for mosques, you’d be required to cover your body, full arms and legs, plus hair and neck for women).

Most churches in Malaysia are unfortunately square and boring on the outside, as I’ve heard it’s got something to do with regulations about the architecture for Christian buildings. This is a real shame, but then again there’s always Europe for those gorgeous Gothic and Baroque cathedrals.

#5 – See the Whole City by Train (LRT)

In Kuala Lumpur, almost every major tourist attraction is accessible by trains. It’s such a cheap and convenient way to see the city. There’s the LRT and Monorail (these go high above the ground, so you get a good view of the sights and can decide to get off at stops if you see a place that catches your fancy) and KTM train (ground level).

Consider buying an LRT token for a long random journey across KL city – it’s kind of like a tour bus, but you get to people-watch as well since regular Malaysians use these trains for their daily commutes.

KL Sentral is the main station where all the trains meet, so that’s a good place to start when planning your journey. Carry an umbrella (or use a cap / hat) and water with you if you ever plan to walk for long distances in KL. So yes, travel like we do.

#6 – Immerse Yourself in the KL Art Scene: Visit Balai Seni Visual Negara (National Visual Arts Gallery) or Support Indie Music at Merdekarya

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This place is worth your time if you’re a lover of visual art, and would like a taste of what Malaysian artists have to offer. Balai Seni Visual Negara houses some truly fantastic pieces from local talents, many of whom are not internationally known.

The building itself is spacious, well-maintained and beautifully minimalist in terms of design. The best part is that this place is almost always empty – for some peculiar reason, Malaysians don’t seem to value visual art all that much.

If art galleries are not your thing, head over to Merdekarya for some indie music. Fantastic place with a very down-to-earth vibe, it’s well-known in local art circles. Remember to bring enough to tip the musicians.

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Volatile, one of my favorite local bands – the kind of music you get at Merdekarya. From left: Raul Dhillon, Jaime Gunther, Sean Choon, Jordan Scully and Reuben Tor

#7 – KL Bird Park

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A pleasant free-flight aviary with plenty of free-ranging, friendly birds. The whole area is canopied with netting that keeps it cool in the day. KL Bird Park is good for adults and kids alike. Great for practicing your photography as the birds come up close.

#8 – Muzium Negara (National Muzium)

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Some people think muziums are lame, but hey, they’re good places to be if you like history. Muzium Negara is quite nicely done, and if you feel like a leisurely stroll down Malaya Memory Lane for the cost of practically nothing, go here. Dioramas, artifacts, stories about the Colonial Era and the Sultanate…you may just end up enjoying yourself. After all, how often do you get to selfie with a bunch of ancient Malay dudes?

#9 – Hang Out at Malls

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Surprised that I’m recommending something as dumb as malls? Hear me out.

Malls here are huge, common, easily accessible by public transportation and a pleasant way to cool off after the unbearable midday heat. Also, great for shopping as there’s always some kind of sale going on. In addition, consider catching a movie at GSC, MBO or TGV, as most major malls have a cinema.

And you know what? Malls are a very KL thing. We do this a lot.

Recommended malls: Suria KLCC, Pavillion KL, Midvalley Megamall, One Utama, Sunway Pyramid, Mitsui Outlet Park KLCC.

#10 – Hiking

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The best part about KL is that you don’t need to drive out that far from the city for a good hike. There are trails and spots varying from easy to challenging, depending on what you need. Check out FRIM (Forest Research Institute Malaysia – easy), Bukit Broga (moderate), all Bukit Tabur treks (can be challenging), Bukit Gasing Forest Reserve (easy to moderate) and more.

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Additional Tips:

  • As a tropical city, KL can get very hot. Protect your skin, head and stay hydrated. Avoid the midday heat.
  • Most places accept credit cards, but KL is not completely cashless. Do carry hard cash with you.
  • Taxis can be expensive. Ubers are more cost-effective here.
  • Busses are not very reliable, but if you have time to kill or a friend to go with you, that’s fine. Trains are the best and cheapest way to get around as traffic can be terrible in KL.
  • KL is a modern city and accepting of most foreign cultures. However, it’s wise to be sensitive to Islamic customs if you’re going to a place frequented by many Muslims, such as a mosque. In such cases, dress modestly and don’t carry / consume with food with pork or alcohol in it to avoid offending anyone.
  • KL is not vegan-friendly. Regular restaurants don’t really understand the term. Most Indian shops will understand what ‘vegetarian’ means and won’t add egg to your food, but may add dairy products. If you’re vegan, do specify that you don’t want egg, milk, yoghurt, meat, fish or seafood added to your food (if you’re particular).

 

Related Links:

Merdekarya – The Original Malaysian Music Bar

Volatile Band Page

Banana Leaf Mythbusters: Devi’s Corner (Bangsar, Kuala Lumpur)

 

Hiking Equipment Review: Deuter AirContact 40+10 SL

by Jana Thevar

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My Experience

I’ve been hiking and backpacking since forever. The funny thing is, I never bothered to ‘invest’ in a proper backpack. I just bought whatever was on sale in the market, would fit on my back and had sufficient space for a bunch of stuff.

That worked well enough for a while, until I ran into some annoying issues. My Lonsdale backpack held up surprisingly well over  years of travel abuse, but the PVC interior lining turned to dust one fine day for no apparent reason. As a person with allergy issues, this was a complete disaster.

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I’ve seen friends and travel partners who had it worse while on the road with me: bags falling apart at the seams, zips and buckles getting damaged, rats chewing through canvas, monkeys learning how to unzip compartments on unattended bags, back problems due to uneven distribution of carrying weight, etc.

Space was also an issue with smaller backpacks, as you’d eventually need a bigger piece of luggage for check-in, which can be a hassle when you need to travel quickly with minimal fuss. Also, wheeled luggage bags can be a nightmare when it comes to rural places. I’ve had to drag a 30-kilo bag through village sand paths (the wheels won’t work), broken cement, damaged roads, mud, potholes, up lengthy flights of stairs, cow dung and worse.

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Needless to say, I’d had enough of that. I can’t believe I didn’t get a proper backpack sooner. I HATE my stuff falling apart mid-travel. So, when I came across a random Deuter backpack sale at Sunway Pyramid, I got myself not one, but two bags (50 and 70 litres). Malaysians will know why I did this; Deuter bags are notoriously expensive here. At 50% off the regular price, it was a steal.

I was also curious with regards to quality and performance. I’m always sceptical when it comes to hyped-up mainstream things. Was Deuter really the gold standard for hiking bags, or was it all just meaningless marketing and branding fluff?

Here’s my review of the Deuter AirContact 40 + 10 SL model (for women).

Test Trip Details

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I backpacked alone to the Perhentian Islands in Malaysia for 4 days and 3 nights. While this doesn’t count as a challenging outdoor hike, it wasn’t a walk in the park either. My bag weighed a total of 13 kgs – I packed it to maximum capacity for testing purposes.

What the travel involved (per way) was a 10-minute Uber trip to the train station, a two-transit train ride totalling 2 hours of travel to the central bus terminal (TBS), an 8-hour bus ride to the island jetty, a 40-minute speedboat ride to the island, then walking by foot along the beach for another 20 minutes to the chalet. It was a lot of getting to, then on and off various modes of transportation – more tiring than it sounds.

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Comfort and Design

Amazingly comfortable as the hip and shoulder straps are well-padded, highly adjustable and can be customized for length and fit perfectly. The AirContact models are also designed for optimum air circulation to prevent excessive sweating during wear – this would be great for long hikes in hot weather.

Aesthetic-wise, I loved the blue color. All the female-model bags come with a cute yellow flower that’s actually a hair tie – how ingenious! There’s a contoured steel spine structure that fits your back curvature and gives the pack some structure. Most bags come with a handy water-proof rain cover, which is great for repelling mud too.

 

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Capacity and Weight

I was surprised that there was less space than I expected for 50 litres. However, when packed to full capacity, 13kgs was about as much as I could carry comfortably on my back (I weigh 45kgs, am slight in build with fairly good core strength). The bag itself isn’t the lightest model either, as it weighs almost 2.3kgs by itself – consider another model for long hikes.

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What’s really great about Deuter designs is that they have tons of mini compartments, loops, clips and spaces which you can literally stow, fasten or hang ANYTHING imaginable. The only limit would be your ability to carry the weight.

Durability

The material doesn’t look very long-wearing, but then again I know from experience that the nylon is light but extremely wear-resistant. The seams and stitching are pretty sturdy.

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Summary

I was pretty spent after my trip back, but it was a good kind of tired. I felt like my core got a really good workout. I could actually notice the difference in my abs! More muscle tone and flatter. Overall, no regrets, though I’d recommend a lighter model for longer hikes.

If you see one on discount, buy it! Absolutely worth the money. In the words of a good friend, the proud owner of a Deuter that has survived over 15 years of hardcore outdoor life:

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“These bags? They last forever”.

 

Related Links:

10 Tips for Women Travelling Alone in India

Ashram Vacations: An Introduction

Deuter (Official Page)

Travel Review: Boracay, Philippines

by Princess Draupadi

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Boracay! The jewel of the Philippines, some say. Cerulean-turquoise waters, tropical sun, over seven thousand islands, fresh seafood, succulent mangoes and all the great things Southeast Asia has to offer. The place has always been a mystery to me, and I’m glad I finally set foot there.

Scenery, view and island vibe

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The best thing about the combination of tropical sunlight, lush volcanic-soil vegetation and clear seawater is the way the colors come alive. Emerald-chartreuse greens punctuated by lazy seabirds, sparkling sapphire waters fading into the golden-white sand. A literal feast for the eyes. It’s the kind of island where you can sit around all day, eating dragonfruits and letting the purple juice run down your chin, taking in the dazzling brilliance of your surroundings and just do absolutely nothing. Yes, it’s that beautiful.

Vibe-wise, it’s laid back. Quiet and relaxed. Not overly crowded with touristy types. Most people on the island appear to be simple village folk. They live fuss-free lives, plying their trade, usually selling local produce and seafood. It’s a far cry from the booze-and-drug-fuelled-party-hype of Balinese and Thai beach nightlife; nothing like the backpacker islands on the Malaysian East Coast either. Boracay is like a legendary island princess – exotic, mysterious and modest, whose real beauty is to be seen and appreciated by the chosen few. Don’t come here for crazy drunken nights and full moon parties.

Food

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Seafood is cheap, fresh and plentiful. Prices are reasonable at tourist-standard spots. The main area in town where most restaurants are based is called D’Mall – not quite a mall, more like an open-air area of eateries, souvenier shops, clothing stalls and the usual stuff catering to tourists.

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If you’re from Malaysia or Indonesia, be prepared for the ‘unusual’ taste of some dishes. I’m adventurous and adaptable enough, but I’ve heard many complaints along the lines of ‘Filipino food tastes very weird”. There’s a mini supermarket in town where you can buy stuff like toiletries, milk, cookies, instant coffee, bread and crackers. I found that prices at this place were quite high.

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I’ll be honest; I didn’t quite like the fish and chips fried in coconut oil (yes, coconut oil of all things – The Hobbit Tavern) and the bland soup featuring a sad chunk of chicken with the life boiled out of it (Jeepney). On the other hand, the grilled squid was great, with just the right amount of flavor and tangy zest (Jeepney), as was the seafood pasta (The Hobbit Tavern). Stay away from the soupy stuff and you should be fine. Food in general is not overly spicy.

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Local tip: A wonderful Filipino girl at Jeepney did this for me and my friend when we said we were Malaysian. She chopped up some bird’s eye chillies, put the pieces into a saucer and poured some salty soy sauce over it. Then, she squeezed lime juice into the mix and gave it a good stir, before telling us to use it as a dip for seafood. It was literally AMAZING. I would’ve never thought something so simple could bring out the subtle flavours of seafood so well, and it had just the right amount of zing. Perfect!

Places to stay

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Accommodation is easily available, from budget to more high-end places. I stayed at Shangri-La Boracay because my friends work there, and we got the rooms for free (lucky me). And Shang being Shang, there’s nothing much to say about it except everything was literally perfect. The resort is gorgeous, the architecture and landscaping stunning. You’re waited on hand and foot by extremely attentive staff. In other words, Shangri-La = an impeccable experience in all ways. The only downside was that the resort was on the other end of the island, and getting ‘out’ was impossible by foot. However, they had regular shuttles to town for that purpose.

Shopping

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Forget it. If you already have experience travelling in Southeast Asia, there’s literally nothing new to buy here. It’s all the same stuff again and again. Beach dresses, shell jewellery, keychains, wife-beaters, mugs, tote bags and Rasta-themed red-yellow-green stuff (I never figured out Boracay’s obsession with reggae culture, but I bought a Bob Marley pareo anyway because I’m a huge fan). Virgin coconut oil is sold everywhere, as are local dried mangoes. And oh, they have purses made of real, whole bullfrogs, if you’re into that sort of thing.

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Weather

Tropical mostly with occasional rain. Plan carefully around the island’s monsoon seasons as the weather can change drastically. We went out sightseeing one night and were suddenly caught in a full-blown typhoon that came out of nowhere. Best to carry a light raincoat or foldable umbrealla when you’re out and about.

Currency

Filipino pesos. It appears that exchange rates are far better in your own country, unless you carry US Dollars with you. Money changers are easy to find.

Nightlife

I didn’t go to any clubs, but the island seemed to generally lack good nightlife. Nobody tried to sell me drugs or sex either.

Beach activities

There’s the usual like snorkeling, diving, paraw sailing, catamaran, yacht, jetski and more. PADI courses are offered on Boracay, but I decided to do mine in the Perhentian Islands in Malaysia.

Verdict?

Great place to go for a couple, a bunch of friends or with family. Expect slightly higher prices and be wary of the monsoon season (the typhoons in the Philippines are not to be taken lightly). I wouldn’t recommend single travelers to go here as there isn’t all that much to do alone.

See Also:

Index of Articles

 

 

Restaurant Review: Fuel Shack (Bangsar South, Malaysia)

by Princess Draupadi

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So, we went out for lunch last week to this place, which is fairly new. If you want to try it out this weekend, it’s located in this building called Connexion @ Nexus, on the Ground floor between Souled Out and Starbucks, Bangsar South.

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I sulked a little after we chose our table and sat down, and I had a good look at what the other diners were having. It sucked even more once the food arrived. Why? Because this place makes me want to have a boyfriend, especially like this one bodybuilder ex I had.

You see, I absolutely loved the Coke Float, but the Fuel Shack serves it in only one size: freaking GIGANTIC. It was so much more convenient and fun to share large helpings of food when I was dating someone. Plus, when your date has the appetite of a water buffalo, you never have to worry about how you’d look pigging out, nor fret that any food would go to waste. Especially as a chick. So date me someone.

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Nah, I’m playing. I’d rather down my body weight’s worth of sugary carbonated float and welcome diabetes with open arms than risk yet another mess of a relationship, just so I can share a float. Which, by the way, I totally ended up wasting.

But seriously, Fuel Shack people, if any of you guys are reading this – wtf? PLEASE offer realistic sizes for floats. Pretty please. The stuff is delicious, but we’re not whales.

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The food in general is above average. We were a team of 10, so there was a variety of stuff I managed to get a taste of. I asked around and everyone seemed to agree with one thing more or less: the fare was a tad bit lacking in flavor and salt. It was pretty good stuff otherwise, reminiscent of TGI Friday’s and Chilli’s, just a little lacklustre overall.

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To their credit, all ingredients used in the dishes were incredibly fresh, and that’s something I really appreciate when it comes to eating out. The Chilli Chicken Fries (above – RM13) and Nachos (below – RM29) were amazingly good – couldn’t get enough of those. Fried Tempura Calamari, so-so (RM21).

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My Crispy-Skinned Grilled Salmon (below – RM38) had great texture, but the accompanying sauce (which was served separately) had an odd vinegary taste. I eagerly dumped the whole sauceboat over my salmon before I even had a taste, so don’t be the idiot that I was. I chose mac and cheese, sauteed vegetables and mushrooms for the three accompanying sides. Overall, my meal was alright, though slightly on the bland side. Pretty small helping of fish.

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Would I return? I would, since I work so near the place. But considering Bangsar South’s horrendous traffic situation, I’d probably not bother if I had to make a long journey to get here, or eat close to rush hour.

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The staff are lovely people too, good service. Be warned: if it’s your birthday, they’re going to make you stand on a chair and sing into a salt shaker.

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My Ratings:

Food (General): 7/10

Food (Crispy-Skinned Grilled Salmon): 6/10

Food (Chilli Chicken Fries): 8/10

Food (Nachos): 8/10

Food (Fried Tempura Calamari): 6/10

Food (BBQ Chicken Wings, according to my buddy Esmund): 7/10

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Drink (Coke Float): 8/10

General Cleanliness: 10/10

Service: 10/10

Price: 7/10

Location (PJ): 5/10

Will I go back again : 10/10

 

Related Posts:

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Banana Leaf Mythbusters: Devi’s Corner, Bangsar

Banana Leaf Mythbusters: Sri Nirwana Maju, USJ 9

Banana Leaf Mythbusters: Moorthys Mathai, USJ 4

Banana Leaf Mythbusters: Sri Ganapathi Mess, PJ

Restaurant Review: Alexis Bistro And Wine Bar (Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia)

Do Crash Diets Really Work?

by Princess Draupadi

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The short answer is, no – they don’t. The health experts were right. A healthy, balanced diet will do more to help you lose weight in the long term, but starving yourself is always a bad idea.

What happens with most ‘starve-yourself-skinny’ diets is this: while you may lose weight temporarily by depriving yourself of food, you’ll also mess up your normal metabolism and shock your body into ‘starvation mode’. When this happens, your body will start preparing to conserve more energy instead of burning it.

The old saying ‘you are what you eat’ couldn’t be more true. Think about this; the food you consume is constantly transforming into bits and pieces of your body – it gets digested and broken down, then replaces old, worn and dead cells. The better the quality of your food, the better the ‘quality’ of the body built from it. Now, what kind of results can one expect from a diet consisting of mainly factory-processed, synthetic-additive-laden or stale food?

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So guess what happens when you start eating normally again, or lose control and go on a food binge? Bingo. Your body stores more calories than usual. This is why on-and-off dieting (and extreme dieting) is bad for you in the long term.

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So what’s a better solution? Eating better and ‘eating cleaner’ consistently. Practise moderation and make educated choices when it comes to your food. Think long term, because it takes time for diet changes to reflect in your body.

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What you should aim for is healthy weight and a fit, strong body. Also, be realistic about your expectations. If you have a naturally bigger frame, you may never be skinny, even at your healthiest point.

On the other hand, if you’re lean no matter what you eat, it’s unwise to push your body too hard to artificially ‘bulk up’. This will put unnecessary strain on your system. Respect your body and how it naturally works. If you know you’re exercising adequately, eating clean and nourishing food, getting the rest you need and generally living a fairly healthy lifestyle, that’s good enough. Keep your fitness and health goals realistic and don’t harm your body.

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Dieting Myths

Contrary to popular belief, carbohydrates, oils and fats are not bad for you. You actually need them in your diet so your body functions at an optimum level. For instance, you do need healthy fats and quality oils in your diet to keep your skin supple and your systems well-lubricated – you can get these from extra-virgin olive oil, ahimsa dairy products, unprocessed nuts and grains and ripe avocados (monounsaturated fat).

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The real culprits are overly-processed foodstuff with cheap, synthetic ingredients (preservatives, artificial color, etc). These are hard for your body to break down, digest and absorb effectively. These foods also leave all kinds of unhealthy residue in your system (known as ama in Ayurveda) and can cause various health issues like gas, bloating and allergies.

And that’s not all. Hardcore dieting can leech your body of important nutrients, causing lethargy, weakness, fainting, weak immunity, dry skin, acne, cracked heels and worse. Always aim for fresh, vitamin and mineral-rich foods.

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Here are a few quick lists (with examples) to help improve your diet as a long-term solution to weight management.

Foods to Avoid:

  • Processed carbohydrates (factory-made noodles, instant porridge)
  • Refined sugar (white cane sugar)
  • Low-grade cooking oil (recycled cooking oil)
  • Leftovers (no longer than 2 days in the refridgerator)
  • Margerine (all kinds)
  • Unrefrigerated cooked food (Ayurvedically considered unfit for consumption after 3 hours)
  • Processed fruit juices

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Healthy Food Substitutes:

  • Honey, brown sugar, palm sugar, molasses and jaggery (instead of white sugar)
  • Wholemeal bread (instead of white bread)
  • Unpolished, parboiled or brown rice
  • Fresh milk (instead of recombined or powdered milk)
  • Extra virgin or virgin vegetable oils (instead of fractionated oils)
  • Whole grains (instead of processed grains)
  • Wholemeal flour (instead of white flour)
  • Fresh fruits and vegetables (instead of canned or preserved)

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Additional Eat-Healthy Tips:

  • Consume something fresh every day (fruits or vegetables)
  • Match each serving of carbohydrates with an equal-sized serving of fresh produce
  • Eat normally for breakfast and lunch, but prepare a nutrient-dense, low-carbohydrate dinner (e.g. a large bowl of salad with a few cubes of feta cheese, plus a drizzle of extra-virgin olive oil)

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A Final Note

Never torment your body for the sake of unrealistic ideals portrayed by the media. You may never be supermodel-skinny even at your healthiest point, and that’s perfectly okay.

Love your body, respect it, appreciate it and help it stay healthy. It’s been working hard for you since the day you were born, through millions of complex bodily processes every single day.

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Related Link:

Kitchiri, the Best Sattvic Detox Food

Hatha Yoga for Weight Loss

Banana Leaf Mythbusters: Devi’s Corner (Bangsar, Malaysia)

by Princess Draupadi

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It baffles me as to why this place is still so popular. Is it just the closest and most convenient place for Bangsar folks to have a full banana leaf meal? I’m not sure, but I’ll stick with that assumption.

Alicia and me went over during lunch hour on Tuesday. It’s been five years since I last ate here, and this visit served to remind me why I didn’t bother going back. We were seated for a good 15 minutes with no one coming over to take our order or ask us what we wanted. We tried to wave some waiters over, but our existence in that restaurant was about as significant as their greasy furniture. Eventually, one came over and said “Banana leaf upstairs.”

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Why, thank you. Perhaps you should have waited till we were on the brink of starvation before making that grand revelation.

So yes, it did appear that upstairs had a pretty well-oiled system of banana leaf food service going on. Service was prompt, systematic and quick, but don’t expect friendliness or warmth. Fairly clean environment overall, by local standards.

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Food:

In general, everything served here was overwhelmingly commercial-masala-powder bland, if you know what I mean. It just made me sad. There was no personal touch, no secret spice blend. Nothing sexy to entice the tongue or excite the senses. No enthusiasm on the cook’s part (considering the wages they’re probably paid, who can blame them?). Food was fairly fresh, though some of the chutneys were cold.

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I asked for the house specialty curry, and this dude unceremoniously dumped a truckload of crab curry onto my rice before I could say anything. Well, okay, that just meant I couldn’t try any other curry since my leaf was literally flooded. The verdict? The crab curry tasted of nothing but factory-milled masala. I may as well have swallowed a bag of curry powder with a glass of hot water. Fried veggies were crisp and drenched in oil. And there wasn’t enough mango in the sugar chutney.

Perhaps their only saving grace was the mutton, but even that was suffocating in masala. The least they could do to honor the fact that a goat gave its life up for our tamasic needs was to, at least, cook it properly (well, sorry for the disservice, goat). I was too depressed to even ask for mooru molega and rasam.

Bear in mind that this review is just a reflection of my own personal taste and opinions, and I am an excellent cook. If I cooked like that at home though, I’d probably be on the receiving end of really good seruppu adi from my mum, plus liberal cringeworthy thuppe from my brothers. Just to be fair, I asked Alicia to taste everything I ate – similar sentiments from her side.

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By the way, here’s a little more info about the pricing. One banana leaf set, one side of mutton, a glass of cold water and a glass of lychee juice came up to RM27. I’m not even going to bother going into details about the breakdown. Here’s an interesting fact though: the lychee drink is RM 5.50 downstairs, and RM6.50 upstairs. Why? Air-conditioning.

So, was it worth my time, total Uber fare price of RM15, plus my bill and experience? Should you visit this place? I’ll let you decide.

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My Ratings:

Food (Standard Vegetarian Banana Leaf meal): 4/10
Food (Signature Dish – Mutton peratal): 6/10
Food (Signature Dish – Crab Curry): 3/10
General Cleanliness: 6/10
Service: 5/10
Price: 4/10
Location (Bangsar): 4/10
Will I go back again : Maybe if kaijus destroyed the Klang Valley and this was the only place left standing.

Address: No. 14, Jalan Telawi 4, Bangsar Baru, 59100 Kuala Lumpur, Wilayah Persekutuan Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Opening Hours: 24-hour restaurant

Related Posts:

Banana Leaf Mythbusters: Moorthy’s Mathai, USJ 4

Banana Leaf Mythbusters: Sri Nirwana Maju, USJ 9

Banana Leaf Mythbusters: Sri Ganapathi Mess, PJ

 

 

Banana Leaf Mythbusters: Sri Nirwana Maju (Subang Jaya, Malaysia)

by Princess Draupadi

This is a surprisingly popular place for Banana Leaf Rice in Subang Jaya. Dinnertime is especially busy. Like every other place, it has its pros and cons. I’ve frequented this place for a couple of years now, and while their standards haven’t dropped in terms of service and cleanliness, the food is, at best, mediocre.

Lately, they’ve stopped serving roti canai, chapati and many other dishes, which is quite bewildering. When I asked the waiter why, he responded that they didn’t have enough cooks. Most of the time, all they serve is banana leaf rice and ‘goreng-goreng’. Cutting costs? Well, who knows. These are hard times for everyone.

Banana Leaf Rice Meal

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I dropped by with my buddy Thara, who is a vegetarian. Hence, this review is solely based on the vegetarian set meal. While the banana leaf rice set is pretty complete and the ingredients fresh, the taste is truly nothing to shout about. If you’re used to authentic Indian food with its full spectrum of spices and flavours, you may be disappointed with what this place has to offer.

The thing that put me off the most was the liberal addition of sugar to some vegetable side dishes (like pumpkin) and pickles. If you like sweet food with your rice, go for it; but if you’re anything like me, steer clear.

The Good: Very clean environment * Food is always freshly prepared * Spacious * Service is fast and efficient

The Bad: Food is generally bland and mediocre in taste * Uncomfortably hot during the afternoon (no air-conditioning)

The Ugly: Sugary-sweet vegetable dishes, pickles, certain chutneys and curries.

My Ratings:

Food (General): 4/10
Food (Banana Leaf Rice set): 5/10
Drinks: 7/10
General Cleanliness: 8/10
Service: 10/10
Price: 5/10
Location (USJ 9): 4/10
Will I go back again: 5/10

Address: No. 1, Jalan USJ 9/5M, Subang Business Centre, 47620, Subang Jaya, Selangor, Malaysia.

Opening Hours: 10AM–11PM

Banana Leaf Mythbusters: Moorthy’s Mathai USJ 4

Index Of Articles

BLOG NAME: YOGINI IN THE CITY

  • Banana Leaf Mythbusters: Devi’s Corner (Bangsar, Malaysia)
  • Banana Leaf Mythbusters: Sri Nirwana Maju (Subang Jaya, Malaysia)
  • Banana Leaf Mythbusters: Moorthy’s Mathai (Subang Jaya, Malaysia)
  • Banana Leaf Mythbusters: Sri Ganapathi Mess (Petaling Jaya, Malaysia)
  • Restaurant Review: Fuel Shack (Bangsar South, Malaysia)
  • Restaurant Review: La Cocina (Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia)
  • Restaurant Review: Bali & Spice (Subang Jaya, Malaysia)
  • Restaurant Review: Alexis Bistro and Wine Bar (Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia)
  • Thaipusam: A Malaysian Indian Experience

BLOG NAME: TRAVEL

  • Travel Review: Boracay, Philippines
  • 10 Tips For Women Traveling Alone In India
  • Hiking Equipment Review: Deuter AirContact 40+10 SL
  • Embracing Swedish Culture: The Art of Fika
  • 10 Ways to Experience Stockholm like a Local

BLOG NAME: SPIRITUALITY

  • Part 1: Everything You Need To Know About Rudraksha
  • Part 2: The Rudraksha Jabala Upanishad (Full Text)
  • Part 3: How To Know If Your Rudraksha Beads Are Genuine
  • Bhakti Yoga Through The Art Of Puja (Part 1)
  • Bhakti Yoga Through The Art Of Puja (Part 2)
  • Bhakti Yoga Through The Art Of Puja (Part 3)
  • Choosing a Mala: Tulasi, Rudraksha or Both?

BLOG NAME: YOGA, HEALTH & MEDITATION

  • Five Main Benefits Of Traditional Hatha Yoga
  • Stretching Safely For Complete Beginners
  • Do Crash Diets Really Work?
  • Hatha Yoga For Weight Loss

BLOG NAME: NEW AGE

Demystifying the Deck: An Introduction to Tarot

BLOG NAME: ART PROJECTS

  • Fashion Photoshoot: Project Israa
  • Mahabharata Indian Art Series by Giampaolo Tomassetti
  • Living Art: Things to Learn from Victor Santal

BLOG NAME: 21ST CENTURY ASHRAM LIFE

  • Ashram Vacations: An Introduction

BLOG NAME: VEDIC LIVING

  • Healing And Rejuvenation With Abhyanga
  • How to Hand Wash Silk Sarees

BLOG NAME: VEGETARIAN RECIPES

  • Kitchiri, The Best Sattvic Detox Food
  • Blue Butterfly Spiced Milk
  • Ayurvedic-Balinese Jamu for Weight Management

BLOG NAME: SELF-HELP & INTROSPECTION

  • How to Heal Yourself from the Damage of a Toxic Relationship (Part 1)

BLOG NAME: MISCELLANEOUS

  • What Does It Take to be a Model?
  • BIGG BOSS: Oviya and Aarav – Are These Two For Real?